Category Archives: Women empowerment

Women safety in India

In India Sati, Sabitri, Durga, Laxmi are worshipped by people treating them as goddesses where as there is increasing number of violence against women. The amount of violence against women has increased by many fold due to the greater exposure of women in every field of life. Women were previously restricted to the four walls of the houses and after globalisation they have got the chances and opportunities to stand equally in all sectors at par with male. Women are now a days cab drivers and they are also the CEO of top companies.

It is a good sign that the patriarchal mind set of the society has changed to some extent but not to the extent it was supposed to. It is the same mind set that restricts women to go out and work making them as a tool for domestication. It is the same mind set that treats males as superior than female and always try to dominate the women folk.

There are different kinds of tools that is being used by the male dominated society to prove their domination over the female. Eve teasing, sexual harassment, rape, domestic violence against women are these weapons used by the male to display the male superiority. This is one of the prime reason violence is increasing in India and women safety is a concern in India.

Along with the mind set the slow pace of operation of Indian judiciary is another major reason for the increasing women safety in India. The police of India is not efficient and not neutral and that is the reason why the cases of violence against women takes long time in the investigation phase. In the name of social pressure and shame many women did not come out and report the matter to police. This is one of the many reasons why the number of cases reported are less than the actual number of violence happening against women.

It is a shame that rapes take place everyday. Rape is a disease which attacks from everywhere to everywhere. It is an evil that has no boundaries. It is present in every nook and corner of the world. It doesn’t differentiate between a 3-year-old kid and an 80-year-old lady. From parties to workplaces to our homes, rape and harassment have become a norm. The survivors of these heinous crimes are then left to be humiliated throughout their life. Some of them even spend their whole “after rape life” on ventilators or they are burnt alive.

In order to improve women safety in India the first task is to improve the number of women in every sphere of society. Along with that the change in mind set of people is very essential for the safety of women. From family to educational institutions men should be taught about respecting females. Further, there should be fast-track courts to hear the cases and they cases should be investigated in a time bound manner. Only strict laws can not solve the problem of women safety in India rather the implementation of these laws in a time bound manner can solve the issue to a large extent.

Courtesy: https://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/blogs/the-rock-bottom/women-safety-in-india/

Who is Florence Nightingale?

Florence Nightingale, (12 May 1820 13 August 1910) was an English social reformer and statistician, and the founder of modernnursing.

Nightingale came to prominence while serving as a manager of nurses trained by her during theCrimean War, where she organised the tending to wounded soldiers.She gave nursing a highly favourable reputation and became an icon of Victorian culture, especially in the persona of “The Lady with the Lamp” making rounds of wounded soldiers at night.

While recent commentators have asserted Nightingale’s achievements in the Crimean War were exaggerated by the media at the time, critics agree on the decisive importance of her follow-up achievements in professionalising nursing roles for women.In 1860, Nightingale laid the foundation of professional nursing with the establishment of hernursing schoolatSt Thomas’ Hospitalin London. It was thefirst secular nursing school in the world, now part ofKing’s College London. In recognition of her pioneering work in nursing, theNightingale Pledgetaken by new nurses, and theFlorence Nightingale Medal, the highest international distinction a nurse can achieve, were named in her honour, and the annualInternational Nurses Dayis celebrated around the world on her birthday. Her social reforms include improving healthcare for all sections of British society, advocating better hunger relief in India, helping toabolish prostitution lawsthat were over-harsh to women, and expanding the acceptable forms of female participation in theworkforce.

Nightingale was a prodigious and versatile writer. In her lifetime, much of her published work was concerned with spreading medical knowledge. Some of her tracts were written insimple Englishso that they could easily be understood by those with poor literary skills. She was also a pioneer in the use ofinfographics, effectively using graphical presentations ofstatisticaldata.Much of her writing, including her extensive work on religion andmysticism, has only been published posthumously.

International Women’s Day

International Women’s Day (IWD) is celebrated on the 8th of March every year around the world. It is a focal point in the movement for women’s rights.

After the Socialist Party of America organized a Women’s Day in New York City on February 28, 1909, German delegates Clara Zetkin, Käte Duncker and others proposed at the 1910 International Socialist Woman’s Conference that “a special Women’s Day” be organized annually. After women gained suffrage in Soviet Russia in 1917, March 8 became a national holiday there. The day was then predominantly celebrated by the socialist movement and communist countries until it was adopted by the feminist movement in about 1967. The United Nations began celebrating the day in 1977.

Commemoration of International Women’s Day today ranges from being a public holiday in some countries to being largely ignored elsewhere. In some places, it is a day of protest; in others, it is a day that celebrates womanhood.

Women’s rights and gender equality are taking centre stage in 2020. Twenty-five years since the adoption of the Beijing Declaration and Platform for Action, a progressive roadmap for gender equality, it’s time to take stock of progress and bridge the gaps that remain through bold, decisive actions.

This year’s theme for International Women’s Day (8 March) is, “I am Generation Equality: Realizing Women’s Rights”.

The Generation Equality campaign is bringing together people of every gender, age, ethnicity, race, religion and country, to drive actions that will create the gender-equal world we all deserve.

Together, we want to mobilize to end gender-based violence; we are calling for economic justice and rights for all; bodily autonomy, sexual and reproductive health and rights; and feminist action for climate justice. We want technology and innovation for gender equality; and feminist leadership.

Women’s empowerment

Women’s empowermentWomen’s empowerment is the process in which women elaborate and recreate what it is to be in a circumstance that they previously were denied. Empowerment can be defined in many ways, however, when talking about women’s empowerment, empowerment means accepting and allowing people (women) who are on the outside of the decision-making process into it. “This puts a strong emphasis on participation in political structures and formal decision-making and, in the economic sphere, on the ability to obtain an income that enables participation in economic decision-making.” Empowerment is the process that creates power in individuals over their own lives, society, and in their communities. People are empowered when they are able to access the opportunities available to them without limitations and restrictions such as in education, profession and lifestyle. Feeling entitled to make your own decisions creates a sense of empowerment. Empowerment includes the action of raising the status of women through education, raising awareness, literacy, and training. Women’s empowerment is all about equipping and allowing women to make life-determining decisions through the different problems in society.

Alternatively, it is the process for women to redefine gender roles that allows for them to acquire the ability to choose between known alternatives whom have otherwise been restricted from such an ability. There are several principles defining women’s empowerment such as, for one to be empowered, they must come from a position of disempowerment. Furthermore, one must acquire empowerment themselves rather than have it given to them by an external party. Other studies have found that empowerment definitions entail people having the capability to make important decisions in their lives while also being able to act on them. Lastly, empowerment and disempowerment is relative to other at a previous time; therefore, empowerment is a process, not a product.

Women empowerment has become a significant topic of discussion in development and economics. It can also point to the approaches regarding other trivialized genders in a particular political or social context.

Women’s economic empowerment refers to the ability for women to enjoy their right to control and benefit from the resources, assets, income and their own time, as well as the ability to manage risk and improve their economic status and well being.

Kalpana Chawla

800px-Kalpana_Chawla,_NASA_photo_portrait_in_orange_suitKalpana Chawla (March 17, 1962 – February 1, 2003) was an American astronaut, engineer, and the first woman of Indian descent to go to space.[2][3] She first flew on Space Shuttle Columbia in 1997 as a mission specialist and primary robotic arm operator. In 2003, Chawla was one of the seven crew members who died in the Space Shuttle Columbia disaster when the spacecraft disintegrated during its re-entry into the Earth’s atmosphere. Chawla was posthumously awarded the Congressional Space Medal of Honor, and several streets, universities and institutions have been named in her honor. The late astronaut is recognized as a national hero in India. She was in space for 336 hrs during research mission.

Chawla was born on March 17, 1962, in Karnal, Haryana, India, but her official date of birth was altered to July 1, 1961, to allow her to become eligible for the matriculation exam. As a child, Kalpana always wanted to fly high, she liked to draw pictures of airplanes. She went to local flying clubs and watched planes with her father. Chawla said “Every once in a while we’d ask my dad if we could get a ride in one of these planes. And, he did take us to the flying club and we had a joyride in the Pushpak and a glider that the flying club had.”

In 1976, Chawla graduated from the Tagore School, where she was a high-performing student. After getting a Bachelor of Engineering degree in Aeronautical Engineering from Punjab Engineering College, India, she moved to the United States in 1982 and obtained a Master of Science degree in Aerospace Engineering from the University of Texas at Arlington in 1984. Chawla went on to earn a second Masters in 1986 and a PhD in aerospace engineering in 1988 from the University of Colorado Boulder.

In 1988, she began working at NASA Ames Research Center, where she did computational fluid dynamics(CFD) research on vertical and/or short take-off and landing(V/STOL) concepts. Much of Chawla’s research is included in technical journals and conference papers. In 1993, she joined Overset Methods, Inc. as Vice President and Research Scientist specializing in simulation of moving multiple body problems. Chawla held a Certificated Flight Instructor rating for airplanes, gliders and Commercial Pilot licenses for single and multi-engine airplanes, seaplanes and gliders). After becoming a naturalized U.S. citizen in April 1991, Chawla applied for the NASA Astronaut Corps. She joined the corps in March 1995 and was selected for her first flight in 1996.

First space mission

Her first space mission began on November 19, 1997, as part of the six-astronaut crew that flew the Space Shuttle Columbia flight STS-87. Chawla was the first Indian woman to fly in space. She spoke the following words while traveling in the weightlessness of space, “You are just your intelligence.” On her first mission, Chawla traveled over 10.4 million miles (16737177.6 km) in 252 orbits of the earth, logging more than 372 hours (15 Days and 12 Hours) in space. During STS-87, she was responsible for deploying the Spartan satellite which malfunctioned, necessitating a spacewalk by Winston Scott and Takao Doi to capture the satellite. A five-month NASA investigation fully exonerated[citation needed] Chawla by identifying errors in software interfaces and the defined procedures of flight crew and ground control. After the completion of STS-87 post-flight activities, Chawla was assigned to technical positions in the astronaut office to work on the space station.

Second space mission

In 2001, Chawla was selected for her second flight as part of the crew of STS-107. This mission was repeatedly delayed due to scheduling conflicts and technical problems such as the July 2002 discovery of cracks in the shuttle engine flow liners. On January 16, 2003, Chawla finally returned to space aboard Space Shuttle Columbia on the ill-fated STS-107 mission. The crew performed nearly 80 experiments studying Earth and space science, advanced technology development, and astronaut health and safety. During the launch of STS-107, Columbias 28th mission, a piece of foam insulation broke off from the Space Shuttle external tank and struck the left wing of the orbiter. Previous shuttle launches had seen minor damage from foam shedding, but some engineers suspected that the damage to Columbia was more serious. NASA managers limited the investigation, reasoning that the crew could not have fixed the problem if it had been confirmed. When Columbia re-entered the atmosphere of Earth, the damage allowed hot atmospheric gases to penetrate and destroy the internal wing structure, which caused the spacecraft to become unstable and break apart. After the disaster, Space Shuttle flight operations were suspended for more than two years, similar to the aftermath of the Challenger disaster. Construction of the International Space Station (ISS) was put on hold; the station relied entirely on the Russian Roscosmos State Corporation for resupply for 29 months until Shuttle flights resumed with STS-114 and 41 months for crew rotation.

Death

The crew of STS-107 in October 2001. From left to right: Brown, Husband, Clark, Kalpana Chawla, Anderson, McCool, Ramon

Chawla died on February 1, 2003, in the Space Shuttle Columbia disaster, along with the other six crew members, when the Columbia disintegrated over Texas during re-entry into the Earth’s atmosphere, shortly before it was scheduled to conclude its 28th mission, STS-107. Chawla’s remains were identified along with those of the rest of the crew members and were cremated and scattered at Zion National Park in Utah in accordance with her wishes.