Independence Day

images (11)Independence Day is annually celebrated on 15 August, as a national holiday in India commemorating the nation’s independence from the United Kingdom on 15 August 1947, the day when the UK Parliament passed the Indian Independence Act 1947 transferring legislative sovereignty to the Indian Constituent Assembly. India still retained King George VI as head of state until its transition to full republican constitution. India attained independence following the Independence Movement noted for largely non-violent resistance and civil disobedience.

Independence coincided with the partition of India, in which the British India was divided along religious lines into the Dominions of India and Pakistan; the partition was accompanied by violent riots and mass casualties, and the displacement of nearly 15 million people due to religious violence. On 15 August 1947, the first Prime Minister of India, Jawaharlal Nehru raised the Indian national flag above the Lahori Gate of the Red Fort in Delhi. On each subsequent Independence Day, the incumbent Prime Minister customarily raises the flag and gives an address to the nation.The entire event is broadcast by Doordarshan, India’s national broadcaster, and usually begins with the shehnai music of Ustad Bismillah Khan.

Independence Day is observed throughout India with flag-hoisting ceremonies, parades and cultural events. It is a national holiday.

Best Secondary School in Kochi, Greets Public School proudly releases “ISHQ TIRANGE SE”, our short film. Wish you all a Happy Independence Day in advance.

https://youtu.be/sv69ZtPjxXM

5 Ways to Help Kids Think Critically

ssdsdThe Foundation for Critical Thinking developed a short series of five “Intellectual Standards,” ways of helping elementary-aged children learn to think better.  Teach these standards to your kids, and then interact with them in ways that reinforce the five standards.

  • Invite them to BE CLEAR by asking for explanations and examples when they don’t understand something.  Let children know it is okay to be confused and ask questions.
  • Urge kids to BE ACCURATE, to check to see if something is true by researching the facts.
  • Encourage children to BE RELEVANT by discussing other topics that are pertinent to the discussion or problem at hand.  Help them stay on track by linking related and meaningful information to the question they are trying to answer or the topic they are learning about.
  • Support your child’s ability to BE LOGICAL.  Help her see how things fit together.  Question how she came to her conclusions and whether her assumptions are correct.
  • Set expectations that your child BE FAIR.  Promote empathy in his thinking processes.  Make sure he considers others when drawing conclusions.

Once parents and children speak a common language about the standards of critical thinking, employ them throughout the year and especially during the summer months!  Along with having fun, your child’s mind will learn to think critically about the world!

Identify Your Childs Primary Learning Style

images (7)What is more important to acknowledge is that your child may have one or two primary learning styles. Let’s learn together the different types of learning, how to identify your child’s primary learning style and the best homework and studying tips to help your child succeed in school and at home.

1. Visual

 The process of learning through the use of pictures, images and spatial understanding. Simply, your child learns best by seeing what is in front of them. For example your child may like to read charts, graphs, or diagrams as main learning technique. Visual learning is a main style and used frequently in most curriculum. If your child is a visual learner, try incorporating a whiteboard into their homework nights and having them draw or write out what they are learning.

2. Aural (Auditory)

 Also known as auditory learning, is the type of learning through sound. This type of learner prefers education through listening, music, and repetition. Often schools will incorporate music and auditory learning techniques like audio books or verbal direction in order to jump start the learners brain. Often group discussions, rhythmic patterns like songs and poems, and reading out loud are good techniques for learning and studying.

3. Verbal (Linguistic)

 Verbal learners prefer to learn through the written and spoken word. The learner succeeds highly in reading and writing. It will help the learner by participating in group discussions, asking questions, and reading studying notes out loud. The verbal techniques are similar to the aural learners. This is because your child is using the same sensors. Try having your child teach you the lesson or homework they are trying to grasp as a studying technique.

4. Physical (Kinesthetic)

 Physical or Kinesthetic learners would rather learn through movement; by using the body, hands, and sense of touch to figure out something new. If your child uses their hands often when they speak to help them explain, then your child is likely to be a kinesthetic learner. Incorporate fun activities to keep your kinesthetic learner’s hands busy. Combining an activity with studying like flashcards to keep the learner active is a good tactic for future success.

5. Logical

 Logical learners use reason and logic to solve problems. Often this learner will use mathematics and critical thinking to their advantage. Logical learners look for connections between concepts and ideas in order to problem solve. The best way for your child to study as a logical learner is to expand all the information, break it into sections and recategorize the information with the new found connections to other parts of the subject.

6. Social

 Social learners excel in group settings. Group projects, discussion and team building exercises. Your child will be highly interested in joining clubs or extracurricular activities like sports teams, debate teams, or band. Keeping a social learners brain active is important; they are likely to respond well to a teacher who keeps them engaged by asking them questions about the topic. Try forming a playdate/study session with your child’s classmates. But, stay involved and run the study group with constant engagement with your social learners.

  1. Solitary

If your child enjoys spending time by themselves in order to read, write and do homework, it’s likely your child is a solitary learner. This type of learner succeeds best by independent learning in quiet studying areas. It’s often difficult to aid a solitary learner, but by giving your learner a quiet work space is the key to success. Solitary learners are also known as “thinkers”; meaning that they often reflect heavily on the subject they are learning about. Try incorporating self reflection journals daily for your independent learner to promote a healthy thought process.

Education

Education is the process of facilitating learning, or the acquisition of knowledge, skills, values, beliefs, and habits. Educational methods include storytelling, discussion, teaching, training, and directed research. Education frequently takes place under the guidance of educators, however learners may also educate themselves. Education can take place in formal or informal settings and any experience that has a formative effect on the way one thinks, feels, or acts may be considered educational. The methodology of teaching is called pedagogy.

Formal education is commonly divided formally into such stages as preschool or kindergarten, primary school, secondary school and then college, university, or apprenticeship.

A right to education has been recognized by some governments and the United Nations. In most regions, education is compulsory up to a certain age. There is a movement for education reform, and in particular for the of evidence-based education.

Formal education occurs in a structured environment whose explicit purpose is teaching students. Usually, formal education takes place in a school environment with classrooms of multiple students learning together with a trained, certified teacher of the subject. Most school systems are designed around a set of values or ideals that govern all educational choices in that system. Such choices include curriculum, organizational models, design of the physical learning spaces (e.g. classrooms), student-teacher interactions, methods of assessment, class size, educational activities, and more.

Preschool

Preschools provide education from ages approximately three to seven, depending on the country when children enter primary education. These are also known as nursery schools and as kindergarten, except in the US, where the term kindergarten refers to the earliest levels of primary education(join the best Kindergarten in Kochi. Kindergarten “provides a child-centred, preschool curriculum for three- to seven-year-old children that aims at unfolding the child’s physical, intellectual, and moral nature with balanced emphasis on each of them. Greets Public School is one of the best Kindergarten School in Kochi.

Primary

Primary (or elementary) education consists of the first five to seven years of formal, structured education. In general, primary education consists of six to eight years of schooling starting at the age of five or six, although this varies between, and sometimes within, countries. Globally, around 89% of children aged six to twelve are enrolled in primary education, and this proportion is rising. Under the Education For All programs driven by UNESCO, most countries have committed to achieving universal enrollment in primary education by 2015, and in many countries, it is compulsory. The division between primary and secondary education is somewhat arbitrary, but it generally occurs at about eleven or twelve years of age. Some education systems have separate middle schools, with the transition to the final stage of secondary education taking place at around the age of fourteen. Schools that provide primary education, are mostly referred to as primary schools or elementary schools. Primary schools are often subdivided into infant schools and junior school. Greets Public School is the best Primary School in Kochi.

In India, for example, compulsory education spans over twelve years, with eight years of elementary education, five years of primary schooling and three years of upper primary schooling. Various states in the republic of India provide 12 years of compulsory school education based on a national curriculum framework designed by the National Council of Educational Research and Training. Enter your children to the best School in Kochi.

Secondary

In most contemporary educational systems of the world, secondary education comprises the formal education that occurs during adolescence. It is characterized by transition from the typically compulsory, comprehensive primary education for minors, to the optional, selective tertiary, “postsecondary”, or “higher” education (e.g. university, vocational school) for adults. Depending on the system, schools for this period, or a part of it, may be called secondary or high schools, gymnasiums, lyceums, middle schools, colleges, or vocational schools. Our’s is the best CBSE Higher Secondary School in Kochi. The exact meaning of any of these terms varies from one system to another. The exact boundary between primary and secondary education also varies from country to country and even within them but is generally around the seventh to the tenth year of schooling.Secondary education occurs mainly during the teenage years.  The purpose of secondary education can be to give common knowledge, to prepare for higher education, or to train directly in a profession. So it very imporatant to choose the best & also best School for secondary education. Greets is the best Secondary School in Kochi & is also top Management School in Cochin.

Tertiary

Higher education, also called tertiary, third stage, or postsecondary education, is the non-compulsory educational level that follows the completion of a school such as a high school or secondary school. Tertiary education is normally taken to include undergraduate and postgraduate education, as well as vocational education and training. Colleges and universities mainly provide tertiary education. Collectively, these are sometimes known as tertiary institutions. Individuals who complete tertiary education generally receive certificates, diplomas, or academic degrees.

Higher education typically involves work towards a degree-level or foundation degree qualification. In most developed countries, a high proportion of the population (up to 50%) now enter higher education at some time in their lives. Higher education is therefore very important to national economies, both as a significant industry in its own right and as a source of trained and educated personnel for the rest of the economy.

University education includes teaching, research, and social services activities, and it includes both the undergraduate level (sometimes referred to as tertiary education) and the graduate (or postgraduate) level (sometimes referred to as graduate school). Some universities are composed of several colleges.

 

Make your child’s future safe by making them a part of Best CBSE higher secondary school in Kochi/ Best secondary school in Kochi/ Top CBSE School in Ernakulam/ Best Kindergarten in Kochi/ Top CBSE School in Cochin/ Best primary school in Kochi/ Best senior secondary school in Kochi – Greets Public School

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Top CBSE School in Ernakulam – Greets Public School

William Shakespeare

william-shakespeare-portrait-of-william-shakespeare-1564-1616-chromolithography-after-hombres-y-mujeres-celebres-1877-barcelona-spain-118154739-57d712c63df78c583373bb00William Shakespeare (bapt. 26 April 1564 – 23 April 1616) was an English poet, playwright, and actor, widely regarded as the greatest writer in the English language and the world’s greatest dramatist. He is often called England’s national poet and the “Bard of Avon” (or simply “the Bard”). His extant works, including collaborations, consist of some 39 plays, 154 sonnets, two long narrative poems, and a few other verses, some of uncertain authorship. His plays have been translated into every major living language and are performed more often than those of any other playwright.

Shakespeare was born and raised in Stratford-upon-Avon, Warwickshire. At the age of 18, he married Anne Hathaway, with whom he had three children: Susanna and twins Hamnet and Judith. Sometime between 1585 and 1592, he began a successful career in London as an actor, writer, and part-owner of a playing company called the Lord Chamberlain’s Men, later known as the King’s Men. At age 49 (around 1613), he appears to have retired to Stratford, where he died three years later. Few records of Shakespeare’s private life survive; this has stimulated considerable speculation about such matters as his physical appearance, his sexuality, his religious beliefs, and whether the works attributed to him were written by others.

Shakespeare produced most of his known works between 1589 and 1613. His early plays were primarily comedies and histories and are regarded as some of the best work produced in these genres. Until about 1608, he wrote mainly tragedies, among them HamletOthelloKing Lear, and Macbeth, all considered to be among the finest works in the English language. In the last phase of his life, he wrote tragicomedies (also known as romances) and collaborated with other playwrights.

Many of Shakespeare’s plays were published in editions of varying quality and accuracy in his lifetime. However, in 1623, two fellow actors and friends of Shakespeare’s, John Heminges and Henry Condell, published a more definitive text known as the First Folio, a posthumous collected edition of Shakespeare’s dramatic works that included all but two of his plays. The volume was prefaced with a poem by Ben Jonson, in which Jonson presciently hails Shakespeare in a now-famous quote as “not of an age, but for all time”.

Throughout the 20th and 21st centuries, Shakespeare’s works have been continually adapted and rediscovered by new movements in scholarship and performance. His plays remain popular and are studied, performed, and reinterpreted through various cultural and political contexts around the world.

How to keep your child safe while on the internet?

Apply these 10 actionable tips to improve Internet safety for your children

1. Educate your kids about cybersecurity and online threats

You want your kids to spend time on the Internet and take advantage of the learning opportunities, but you also want them to be safe. To do that, you need to explain in simple and kid language about online threats and how to identify them.

When it comes to cybersecurity, education plays a vital role during the learning process,  and parents need to talk to their children about safe browsing on the Internet, malicious sites they can access, explain about different forms of cyberbullying, and other necessary topics that help them have a bigger picture of what’s going on.

The more you speak openly about online threats with your kids about their activity on the Internet, the easier is for them to understand what they see or hear online.

 

2. Set usage limits and time spend on the Internet for your kids

The Internet might be a fascinating world for kids, but most parents become really concerned about the time spent there. If you notice your kid is developing an addiction to staying up all night to be on the Internet, it could be a sign to set usage limits and time spend on the Internet. Make sure you clearly tell them about the time they can spend on their computer or laptop.

Parents should also clarify what their kids can and can’t do when they navigate online.

3. Be patient and listen to your kids. Let them teach you

Staying online can be a daunting task and we cannot always predict where a discussion or comment will go or what type of people we find on social media networks.

You may check your kids’ computers, their smartphones or any other Internet-connected devices on a daily basis, but it really helps listen to them.

But how much do we actually know about our children?

In just a few words…not very much, because there will always be methods to evade our attention.

So, we strongly advise you to be patient and listen to your kids. Let them teach you about the social media platforms they use or the latest video that went viral on Youtube.

This is by far the easiest way to get information about their online habits, instead of losing time on spying their computers and trying to understand their browsing history.

So, just listen to them. Pretend that you don’t know too much about this Internet thing and let them start talking. There’s nothing more exciting for children than pretending to be teachers. Not to mention the trust they gain in themselves and finally, in you, as a parent.

4. Use parental control software to monitor your child’s online activities

Given the increasing number of devices kids use to connect on the Internet, it’s difficult for parents to supervise every time they’re online. Parental control apps can help. They are a great way to track your children online behavior and control what they are doing on their smartphones or other devices.

These software solutions act as an online guardian and help parents better monitor kids’ Internet usage, keep track of visited sites, control the Internet connection time, or block malicious websites and report any unusual online activity.

If you want to monitor your kids’ activity and are looking for free parental control software tools, this list comes in handy.

5. Install an antivirus solution on your kids’ devices

We all know that kids are naturally curious and attracted to new things, and they can easily access malicious links from untrusted websites or download video games from unknown web locations.

Thus, you need to consider installing a good antivirus solution from a reliable company that packs a real-time scanning engine, firewall and automatic update.

To help you decide what is the best solution for you and your family, whether you need free or paid antivirus, this in-depth security guide might help.

6. Keep your child’s software up-to-date

Here’s another Internet safety tip every parent should follow. Make sure you check if the Windows operating system used on your child device has all the latest and available security patches installed, such as browsers, plugins, desktop apps, etc. These updates include both security and feature patches and are meant to fix or improve the software you use.

If you aren’t aware of the importance of software patching, please read what security experts have to say about this topic.

Throughout our security alerts, we’ve learned that cybercriminals usually gain access to networks and systems by exploiting security flaws found in popular software tools like Adobe Flash, Java or browsers like Internet Explorer, Mozilla Firefox and Google Chrome.

That’s why you need to verify the device your children are using and make sure all necessary security patches are installed.

For monitoring your kid’s computer apps and securely deploying updates as soon as they’re available, you can use our Thor Free security solution which does an excellent job.

7. Don’t let kids navigate online without installing an anti-malware solution

If you hear your child complaining about slow-down issues, pop-ups all over the screen, new toolbars, a different default engine or random error messages, these could be warning signs of a malware infection.

An antivirus solution is no longer enough to protect you and your family against next-gen malware. To keep your kids safe on the Internet, we recommend using an anti-malware solution as an extra layer of protection to secure your digital assets.

8Secure your Home Wireless network from prying eyes

The home Wi-Fi network is usually accessed only by members of the same house, but that doesn’t mean that malicious actors can’t get unauthorized access.

To better secure your home wireless network from prying eyes, the first thing to do is set up a strong and unique password so neighbors or other people can’t take control over your personal data.

But we have to take security seriously and do more than just adding a strong password. Online criminals might exploit your poor Wi-fi security measures and “listen” to your traffic in order to retrieve sensitive information or take advantage of your network to launch attacks such as Man-in-the-Middle attacks, network sniffing or data theft.

9. Do NOT connect to unsecured WiFi networks outside your home

Your children may be safe at home, but with so many Wi-Fi public networks they connect to, how can we be sure they will remain safe?

We often go to public places and enjoy a coffee or tea, without even thinking about the online dangers or hackers that could wait for our connection to start.

Even if we can’t be anywhere, there are still a few things we can do to greatly improve their online security.

First, make sure the smartphone, laptop or tablet they use has some sort of protection, like anti-spyware or antivirus protection to keep the software protected against exploits and security breaches.

Secondly, information is the secret for your kids’ online safety, no matter where they are, so read these actionable measures on how you can improve the public Wi-Fi network.

10. Online habits have real-life consequences

As challenging as might be for children to understand the risks of being online, cybersecurity awareness is vital these days. We should teach them to avoid talking to strangers online, how to distinguish between fake and real news, and explain about the most frequent security risks out there.

Various choices and decisions should be made to increase our family’s security strategy, but we need to establish what is it that we are afraid of. The limits we set may increase our online security strategy, but at the same time, we could risk blocking the naturaldevelopment of our children being surrounded by tech gadgets.

Children need to acknowledge that online actions lead to real-life consequences and have cyber hygiene on how to use the Internet safely.

Mother’s Day

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Mother’s Day is a celebration honoring the mother of the family, as well as motherhood, maternal bonds, and the influence of mothers in society. It is celebrated on various days in many parts of the world, most commonly in the months of March or May. It complements similar celebrations honoring family members, such as Father’s Day, Siblings Day, and Grandparents Day.

The modern Mother’s Day began in the United States, at the initiative of Anna Jarvis in the early 20th century. This is not (directly) related to the many traditional celebrations of mothers and motherhood that have existed throughout the world over thousands of years, such as the Greek cult to Cybele, Rhea the Great Mother of the Gods, the Roman festival of Hilaria, or the Christian Mothering Sunday celebration (originally a commemoration of Mother Church, not motherhood). However, in some countries, Mother’s Day is still synonymous with these older traditions.

The U.S.-derived modern version of Mother’s Day has been criticized for having become too commercialized. Founder Jarvis herself regretted this commercialism and expressed views on how that was never her intention.

Kunjunni Mash

KunhunnimashKunjunni (10 May 1927 – 26 March 2006), popularly known as Kunjunni Mash (Mash is the Malayalam equivalent of teacher), was an Indian poet of Malayalam literature. Known for his short poems with a philosophical overtone, his works were popular among the children as well as the grown-ups. He received several honours including three awards from the Kerala Sahitya Akademi viz. Kerala Sahitya Akademi Award for Children’s Literature, Kerala Sahitya Akademi Award for Poetry and Kerala Sahitya Akademi Award for Overall Contributions.

Early life and career

Kunjunni was born on May 10, 1927 at Valapad, a village in Thrissur district in the south Indian state of Kerala to Njayapilly Illathu Neelakantan Moosath and Athiyarathu Narayani Amma. Kunjunni started his career as a teacher at the Chelari school. He joined Ramakrishna Mission Sevashrama High School in Kozhikode in 1953. He was an inmate of the Ashrama and taught, looked after and interacted with the hostel boys there. He retired from teaching in 1982 but continued to live in the Ashrama, which he had found to be most suitable for his unpretentious life and writings known for their simplicity, till he retired to his district for health reasons. Kunjunni died in his ancestral house at Valapad on 26 March 2006.

He was known and admired for living a humble life with minimal needs, and few comforts or luxuries.

Works

He was known for writing short poems which appeared to be childlike in form, but conveyed a message. Kunjunni handled the column for children in the Mathrubhumi weekly under the pseudonym “Kuttettan”. He initiated three or four generations of aspiring writers into writing. Kunjunni returned to his native village in 1987 and became involved in social and cultural activities in the Thrissur area. He appeared in Bhoomi Geetham, a 1993 film directed by Kamal. His autobiography, Enniloode, is noted for its candour, humour and simplicity. Oridathu Oridathu Oru Kunjunni Mash is a biography of the poet, written by Sippy Pallippuram.

Earth Day

Earth Day is an annual event celebrated around the world on April 22 to demonstrate support for environmental protection. First celebrated in 1970, it now includes events coordinated globally by the Earth Day Network in more than 193 countries.

On Earth Day 2016, the landmark Paris Agreement was signed by the United States, China, and some 120 other countries. This signing satisfied a key requirement for the entry into force of the historic draft climate protection treaty adopted by consensus of the 195 nations present at the 2015 United Nations Climate Change Conference in Paris.

In 1969 at a UNESCO Conference in San Francisco, peace activist John McConnell proposed a day to honor the Earth and the concept of peace, to first be celebrated on March 21, 1970, the first day of spring in the northern hemisphere. This day of nature’s equipoise was later sanctioned in a proclamation written by McConnell and signed by Secretary General U Thant at the United Nations. A month later a separate Earth Day was founded by United States Senator Gaylord Nelson as an environmental teach-in first held on April 22, 1970. Nelson was later awarded the Presidential Medal of Freedom award in recognition of his work. While this April 22 Earth Day was focused on the United States, an organization launched by Denis Hayes, who was the original national coordinator in 1970, took it international in 1990 and organized events in 141 nations.

Numerous communities celebrate Earth Week, an entire week of activities focused on the environmental issues that the world faces. In 2017, the March for Science occurred on Earth Day (April 22, 2017) and was followed by the People’s Climate Mobilization (April 29, 2017).

Jallianwala Bagh Massacre

The Jallianwala Bagh massacre, also known as the Amritsar massacre, took place on 13 April 1919 when Acting Brigadier-General Reginald Dyer ordered troops of the British Indian Army to fire their rifles into a crowd of unarmed civilians in Jallianwala Bagh, Amritsar, Punjab, killing at least 400, including 41 children, one only six weeks old. Over 1,000 were injured.

The Jallianwalla Bagh is a public garden of 6 7 acres (2.8 ha), walled on all sides, with only five narrow entrances. Dyer blocked the main exits, and the troops continue to fire into the fleeing civilians until their ammunition was almost exhausted. He later declared his purpose was not to dispel the rally, but to “punish the Indians”. He did not stay to count the dead, much less offer aid, and his curfew condemned many of the wounded to die overnight where they lay.

On Sunday, 13 April 1919, Dyer, convinced a major insurrection could take place, banned all meetings. This notice was not widely disseminated, and many villagers gathered in the Bagh to celebrate the important Sikh festival of Baisakhi, and peacefully protest the arrest and deportation of two national leaders, Satyapal and Saifuddin Kitchlew. Dyer and his troops entered the garden, blocking the main entrance behind them, took up position on a raised bank, and with no warning opened fire on the crowd for about ten minutes, directing their bullets largely towards the few open gates through which people were trying to flee, until the ammunition supply was almost exhausted. The following day Dyer stated in a report that “I hear that between 200 and 300 of the crowd were killed. My party fired 1,650 rounds”.

The Hunter Commission report published the following year by the Government of India criticised both Dyer and the Government of the Punjab for failing to compile a casualty count, and quoted a figure offered by the Sewa Samati (a Social Services Society) of 379 identified dead, and approximately 1,100 wounded, of which 192 were seriously injured.The casualty number estimated by the Indian National Congress was more than 1,500 injured, with approximately 1,000 dead.

Dyer was initially lauded for his actions in Britain and became a hero among many who were directly benefiting from the British Raj, such as members of the House of Lords. He was, however, widely criticised in the House of Commons, whose July 1920 committee of investigation censured him. Because he was a soldier acting on orders, he could not be tried for murder. The military chose not to bring him before a court martial, and he was only removed from his current appointment, turned down for a proposed promotion, and barred from further employment in India. Dyer retired from the army and he returned to England, where he died unrepentant in 1927.

Responses polarized both the British and Indian people. Eminent author Rudyard Kipling declared at the time that Dyer “did his duty as he saw it”. This incident shocked Rabindranath Tagore (the first Asian Nobel laureate) to such extent that he stated that “such mass murderers aren’t worthy of giving any title to anyone”.

The massacre caused a re-evaluation by the British Army of its military role against civilians to minimal force whenever possible, although later British actions during the Mau Mau insurgencies in Kenya have led historian Huw Bennett to note that the new policy was not always carried out. The army was retrained and developed less violent tactics for crowd control.

The level of casual brutality, and lack of accountability “stunned the entire nation”, resulting in a “wrenching loss of faith” of the general Indian public in the intentions of the UK. The ineffective inquiry, together with the initial accolades for Dyer, fuelled great widespread anger against the British among the Indian populace, leading to the Non-cooperation Movement of 1920–22. Some historians consider the episode a decisive step towards the end of British rule in India.

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