National Science Day

National Science Day is celebrated in India on 28 February each year to mark the discovery of the Raman effect by Indian physicist Sir C. V. Raman on 28 February 1928.

For his discovery, Sir C.V. Raman was awarded the Nobel Prize in Physics in 1930.

History of National Science Day

In 1986, the [[National Council for Science and Technology Communication]] asked the Government of India to designate February 28 as National Science Day. The event is now celebrated all over the country in schools, colleges, universities and other academic, scientific, technical, medical and research institutions. On the occasion of the first NSD (National Science Day)(28 February 1987) NCSTC announced institution of the National Science Popularization awards for recognizing outstanding efforts in the area of science communication and population.

Celebration of National Science Day

National science day is celebrated every year on 28 February. The celebration also includes public speeches, radio, TV, science movies, science exhibitions based on themes and concepts, , debates, quiz competitions, lectures, science model exhibitions and many more activities.

Objectives of Celebrating National Science Day

National Science Day is being celebrated every year to widely spread a message about the Importance of science used in the daily life of the people. To display all the activities, efforts and achievements in the field of science for human welfare. It is celebrated to discuss all the issues and implement new technologies for the development in the field of science. To give an opportunity to the scientific minded citizens in the country. To encourage the people as well as popularize the science and technology.

Themes of National Science Day

The theme of the year 1999 was “Our Changing Earth”.

The theme of the year 2000 was “Recreating Interest in Basic Science”.

The theme of the year 2001 was “Information Technology for Science Education”.

The theme of the year 2002 was “Wealth From Waste”.

The theme of the year 2003 was “50 years of DNA & 25 years of IVF – The Blue print of Life”.

The theme of the year 2004 was “Encouraging Scientific Awareness in Community”.

The theme of the year 2005 was “Celebrating Physics”.

The theme of the year 2006 was “Nurture Nature for our future”.

The theme of the year 2007 was “More Crop Per Drop”.

The theme of the year 2008 was “Understanding the Planet Earth”.

The theme of the year 2009 was “Expanding Horizons of Science”.

The theme of the year 2010 was “Gender Equity, Science & Technology for Sustainable Development”.

The theme of the year 2011 was “Chemistry in Daily Life”.

The theme of the year 2012 was “Clean Energy Options and Nuclear Safety”.

The theme of the year 2013 was “Genetically Modified Crops and Food Security”.

The theme of the year 2014 was “Fostering Scientific Temper”.

The theme of the year 2015 was “Science for Nation Building”.

The theme of the year 2016 was on “Scientific Issues for Development of the Nation”.

The theme of the year 2017 was “Science and Technology for Specially Abled Persons”

The theme of the year 2018 was “Science and Technology for a sustainable future.”

The theme of the year 2019 is “Science for the People, and the People for Science”

The theme of the year 2020 is “Women in Science.”

Coronaviruses

Coronaviruses are types of viruses that typically affect the respiratory tracts of birds and mammals, including humans. Doctors associate them with the common cold, bronchitis, pneumonia, and severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS), and they can also affect the gut.

These viruses are typically responsible for common colds more than serious diseases. However, coronaviruses are also behind some more severe outbreaks.

Over the last 70 years, scientists have found that coronaviruses can infect mice, rats, dogs, cats, turkeys, horses, pigs, and cattle. Sometimes, these animals can transmit coronaviruses to humans.

Most recently, authorities identified a new coronavirus outbreak in China that has now reached other countries. It has the name coronavirus disease 2019, or COVID-19.

In this article, we explain the different types of human coronaviruses, their symptoms, and how people transmit them. We also focus on three particularly dangerous diseases that have spread due to coronaviruses: COVID-19, SARS, and MERS.

What is a coronavirus?

Researchers first isolated a coronavirus in 1937. They found a coronavirus responsible for an infectious bronchitis virus in birds that had the ability to devastate poultry stocks.

Scientists first found evidence of human coronaviruses (HCoV) in the 1960s in the noses of people with the common cold. Two human coronaviruses are responsible for a large proportion of common colds: OC43 and 229E.

The name “coronavirus” comes from the crown-like projections on their surfaces. “Corona” in Latin means “halo” or “crown.”

Among humans, coronavirus infections most often occur during the winter months and early spring. People regularly become ill with a cold due to a coronavirus and may catch the same one about 4 months later.

This is because coronavirus antibodies do not last for a long time. Also, the antibodies for one strain of coronavirus may be ineffective against another one.

Symptoms

Cold- or flu-like symptoms usually set in from 2–4 days after a coronavirus infection and are typically mild. However, symptoms vary from person-to-person, and some forms of the virus can be fatal.

Symptoms include:

  • sneezing
  • runny nose
  • fatigue
  • cough
  • fever in rare cases
  • sore throat
  • exacerbated asthma

Scientists cannot easily cultivate human coronaviruses in the laboratory unlike the rhinovirus, which is another cause of the common cold. This makes it difficult to gauge the impact of the coronavirus on national economies and public health.

There is no cure, so treatments include self-care and over-the-counter (OTC) medication. People can take several steps, including:

  • resting and avoiding overexertion
  • drinking enough water
  • avoiding smoking and smoky areas
  • taking acetaminophen, ibuprofen, or naproxen for pain and fever
  • using a clean humidifier or cool mist vaporizer

A doctor can diagnose the virus responsible by taking a sample of respiratory fluids, such as mucus from the nose, or blood.

Republic Day

 

Republic Day is the day when India adopted its constitution. It was on 26 January 1950 that the Government of India adopted the constitution and since then 26 January is celebrated as the Republic day of India. It holds a special place in the lives of all the citizens of the country and is also a national holiday for all.

Republic Day is celebrated with full zeal and enthusiasm all over the country and this day is declared as a gazette public holiday by the government of India. It is a matter of pride and honor to celebrate this significant day. There are cultural programs in schools, speeches, and other competitions like quiz, essays related to Indian freedom movement are organized. All over the nation, people hoist flags and sing national anthem.

The President of India presides over the parade of Indian Armed Forces in the capital of the nation, New Delhi. The parade is organized on Rajpath from Vijay Chowk to India Gate. In this parade, the Armed Forces display their vigor, enthusiasm and weaponry. It is followed by a cultural presentation by the States and Union Territories of India. All this display is fittingly preceded by the flag hoisting ceremony which is the most important part. It is accompanied by the singing of National Anthem.

On this day, bravery awards are also given to children and citizens of the nation to motivate people and bring them a sense of nationalism and pride to the nation.

Should Plastic Bags Be Banned?

Plastic bags should be banned. Plastic is non-bio-degradable and thus causes pollution; as it cannot be recycled, burning plastic diffuses harmful smoke. Plastic also emits some radiation. Plastic bags can prove to be a choke hazard for small animals and people. Plastic water bottles are also thought to be carcinogenic.

400px-Plastic_Pollution_in_Ghana

Problems Caused by Plastic Bags

Non-Biodegradable

Plastic bags are non-biodegradable. Thus, disposing of the plastics is the biggest challenge. T

Deterioration of Environment

They are destroying nature due to their harmful effect. Plastic bags have become the main cause of land pollution today. The plastic bags entering into the water bodies are a major cause of water pollution. Hence we can conclude that these are deteriorating our environment in every possible way.

Harmful for Animals and Marine Creatures

Animals and marine creatures unknowingly consume plastic particles along with their food. Research shows that waste plastic bags have been a major reason for untimely animal deaths.

Cause of Illness in Humans

The production of plastic bags releases toxic chemicals. These are the main cause of serious illness. The polluted environment is a major reason for various diseases which are spreading easily in human beings.

Clogged Sewage

Waste plastic bags are the main reason for trapping the drains and sewers, especially during rains. This can result in a flood-like situation and disrupt the normal life of people.

Reasons to Ban Plastic Bags

There are numerous reasons why the government of various countries has come up with strict measures to limit the use of plastic bags. Some of these include:

  • Waste plastic bags are polluting the land and water immensely.
  • Plastic bags have become a threat to the life of animals living on earth as well as in water.
  • Chemicals released by waste plastic bags enter the soil and make it infertile.
  • Plastic bags are having a negative impact on human health.
  • Plastic bags lead to the drainage problem.

Public Support for Plastic Bag Ban

Although the Indian government has imposed a ban on the usage of plastic bags in many states. But people are still carrying these bags. Shopkeepers stop providing plastic bags for few days only in the beginning.

It is time when we all must contribute our bit to make this ban a success. Thus we the educated lot of society must take it as our responsibility to stop using plastic bags. In this way, we can support the government in this campaign.

Some contributions that can be made by people are as follows:

Keep a Tab

In order to be successful in this mission, we must keep reminding ourselves about the harmful effects of the plastic bags on our nature and keep a tab on their use. Gradually, we will become habitual to doing without these bags.

Seek Alternatives

There are many eco-friendly alternatives to plastic bags like reusable jute or cloth bag.

Reuse

We must reuse the plastic bags we already have at home as many times as we can before throwing them away.

Spread Awareness

While the government is spreading awareness about the harmful effects of plastic bags, we can also spread awareness through word of mouth.

Conclusion

Although plastic is becoming a big threat for all of us, still this problem has often been overlooked and underestimated. This is because people do not look at the long term effect of these small, easy to carry bags they use in their everyday life. Besides all of these people keep using bags due to their convenience. But now everyone has to completely stop using the plastic bag to save our environment and earth.

Wonder of Science

Looking at the age when a man led a life like a savage, we notice how far we have come. Similarly, the evolution of mankind is truly commendable. One of the major driving forces behind this is science. It makes you think about the wonder of science and how it has proven to be such a boon in our lives. Most importantly, science has helped develop a great civilization. All the advancements that man has been able to make are with the help of science only. However, it won’t be wrong to say that science is a two-edged sword. It comes with its own set of advantages and disadvantages.

 

Advantages of Science

To say that science has a lot of benefits would be an understatement. The benefits of science do not just limit to one sphere, but it has proven useful in various spheres of the world. When we talk about innovations in science and engineering, electricity is the first thing that comes to mind. It has helped power the world through its development.

That is to say, all the credit goes to science, as it weren’t for science, life in the 21st century would be impossible. After all, it is quite hard to imagine a world without computers, medicines, televisions, AC’s, automobiles and more. In addition, science has contributed largely to the medical field as well.

It has helped cure deadly diseases and also perform surgeries which were hard to perform before. Therefore, science has changed the world in unimaginable ways.

Disadvantages of Science

As the saying goes ‘there is no rainbow without rain’, similarly science has drawbacks of its own. One must always remember that anything in excess is poison, and science is no different. If it falls into evil hands, it can cause destruction on a massive level. For instance, science is used to create nuclear weapons.

These are deadly enough to cause war and wipe out full-fledged countries. Another drawback is the pollution caused by it. As the world became more industrialized because of science, pollution levels increased. All the high-scale industries are now polluting natural resources like water, air, wood, and more.

Subsequently, this industrial growth has increased rates of unemployment as machines are replacing human labor. So, we see how it also has a considerable amount of drawbacks as well.

In conclusion, we can say that surely science is very beneficial to the modern man. But, innovations and discoveries have also become destructive in various ways for mankind.

UNICEF

UNICEF works in over 190 countries and territories to protect the rights of every child. UNICEF has spent 70 years working to improve the lives of children and their families.

The United Nations Children’s Fund is a United Nations agency responsible for providing humanitarian and developmental aid to children around the world. It was established in 1946 as the United Nations International Children’s Emergency Fund (UNICEF) by the U.N. General Assembly, at the behest of Polish physician Ludwik Rajchman, to provide immediate hunger relief and healthcare to children and mothers in countries devastated by World War II. In 1950, UNICEF’s mandate was extended to address the long-term needs of children and women in developing countries, and in 1953 it became a permanent part of the United Nations System. The agency’s name was subsequently changed to its current form, though it retains the original acronym.

UNICEF relies entirely on contributions from governments and private donors. Its total income as of 2018 was $5.2 billion, of which two-thirds came from governments; private groups and individuals contribute the rest through national committees. It is governed by a 36-member executive board that establishes policies, approves programs, and oversees administrative and financial plans. The board is made up of government representatives elected by the United Nations Economic and Social Council, usually for three-year terms.

UNICEF’s programs emphasize developing community-level services to promote the health and well-being of children. Most of its work is in the field, with a presence in 192 countries and territories. Its network includes 150 country offices, headquarters and other offices, and 34 “national committees” that carry out its mission through programs developed with host governments. Seven regional offices provide technical assistance to country offices as needed.

UNICEF’s Supply Division is based in Copenhagen and New York, both serves as point of distribution for such essential items as vaccines, antiretroviral medicines for children and mothers with HIV, nutritional supplements, emergency shelters, family reunification, and educational supplies. UNICEF was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize in 1965, the Indira Gandhi Prize in 1989 and the Prince of Asturias Award of Concord in 2006.

Jawaharlal Nehru

JnehruPandit Jawaharlal Nehru (14 November 1889 – 27 May 1964) was an Indian independence activist, and subsequently, the first Prime Minister of India and a central figure in Indian politics before and after independence. He emerged as an eminent leader of the Indian independence movement under the tutelage of Mahatma Gandhi and served India as Prime Minister from its establishment as an independent nation in 1947 until his death in 1964. He has been described by the Amar Chitra Katha as the architect of India. He was also known as Pandit Nehru due to his roots with the Kashmiri Pandit community while Indian children knew him as Chacha Nehru (Hindi, lit., “Uncle Nehru”).

The son of Motilal Nehru, a prominent lawyer and nationalist statesman and Swaroop Rani, Nehru was a graduate of Trinity College, Cambridge and the Inner Temple, where he trained to be a barrister. Upon his return to India, he enrolled at the Allahabad High Court and took an interest in national politics, which eventually replaced his legal practice. A committed nationalist since his teenage years, he became a rising figure in Indian politics during the upheavals of the 1910s. He became the prominent leader of the left-wing factions of the Indian National Congress during the 1920s, and eventually of the entire Congress, with the tacit approval of his mentor, Gandhi. As Congress President in 1929, Nehru called for complete independence from the British Raj and instigated the Congress’s decisive shift towards the left.

Nehru and the Congress dominated Indian politics during the 1930s as the country moved towards independence. His idea of a secular nation-state was seemingly validated when the Congress swept the 1937 provincial elections and formed the government in several provinces; on the other hand, the separatist Muslim League fared much poorer. But these achievements were severely compromised in the aftermath of the Quit India Movement in 1942, which saw the British effectively crush the Congress as a political organisation. Nehru, who had reluctantly heeded Gandhi’s call for immediate independence, for he had desired to support the Allied war effort during World War II, came out of a lengthy prison term to a much altered political landscape. The Muslim League under his old Congress colleague and now opponent, Muhammad Ali Jinnah, had come to dominate Muslim politics in India. Negotiations between Congress and Muslim League for power sharing failed and gave way to the independence and bloody partition of India in 1947.

Nehru was elected by the Congress to assume office as independent India’s first Prime Minister, although the question of leadership had been settled as far back as 1941, when Gandhi acknowledged Nehru as his political heir and successor. As Prime Minister, he set out to realise his vision of India. The Constitution of India was enacted in 1950, after which he embarked on an ambitious program of economic, social and political reforms. Chiefly, he oversaw India’s transition from a colony to a republic, while nurturing a plural, multi-party system. In foreign policy, he took a leading role in the Non-Aligned Movement while projecting India as a regional hegemon in South Asia.

Under Nehru’s leadership, the Congress emerged as a catch-all party, dominating national and state-level politics and winning consecutive elections in 1951, 1957, and 1962. He remained popular with the people of India in spite of political troubles in his final years and failure of leadership during the 1962 Sino-Indian War. In India, his birthday is celebrated as Bal Diwas (Children’s Day).

Plastic pollution

400px-Plastic_Pollution_in_Ghana

Plastic pollution is the accumulation of plastic objects and particles (e.g.: plastic bottles and much more) in the Earth’s environment that adversely affects wildlife, wildlife habitat, and humans. Plastics that act as pollutants are categorized into micro-, meso-, or macro debris, based on size. Plastics are inexpensive and durable, and as a result levels of plastic production by humans are high. However, the chemical structure of most plastics renders them resistant to many natural processes of degradation and as a result they are slow to degrade. Together, these two factors have led to a high prominence of plastic pollution in the environment.

Plastic pollution can afflict land, waterways and oceans. It is estimated that 1.1 to 8.8 million metric tons (MT) of plastic waste enters the ocean from coastal communities each year. Living organisms, particularly marine animals, can be harmed either by mechanical effects, such as entanglement in plastic objects, problems related to ingestion of plastic waste, or through exposure to chemicals within plastics that interfere with their physiology. Effects on humans include disruption of various hormonal mechanisms.

As of 2018, about 380 million tons of plastic is produced worldwide each year. From the 1950s up to 2018, an estimated 6.3 billion tons of plastic has been produced worldwide, of which an estimated 9% has been recycled and another 12% has been incinerated. This large amount of plastic waste enters the environment, with studies suggesting that the bodies of 90% of seabirds contain plastic debris. In some areas there have been significant efforts to reduce the prominence of free range plastic pollution, through reducing plastic consumption, litter cleanup, and promoting plastic recycling.

Some researchers suggest that by 2050 there could be more plastic than fish in the oceans by weight.

Serious Effects of Plastic Pollution

It seems rather obvious that this amount of a material that isn’t meant to break down can wreak havoc on natural environments, leading to long-term issues for plants, animals, and people. Some of the major long-term effects of plastic pollution are:

1. It Upsets the Food Chain

Because it comes in sizes large and small, polluting plastics even affect the world’s tiniest organisms such as plankton. When these organisms become poisoned due to plastic ingestion, this causes problems for the larger animals that depend on them for food. This can cause a whole slew of problems, each step further along the food chain. Plus, it means that plastic are present in the fish that many people eat everyday.

2. Groundwater Pollution

Water conservation is already a concern in places ranging from California to parts of India, but the world’s water is in great danger because of leaking plastics and waste. If you’ve ever seen a garbage dump, imagine what happens every time it rains – then imagine that being in your drinking water. Groundwater and reservoirs are susceptible to leaking environmental toxins.

Most of the litter and pollution affecting the world’s oceans also derives from plastics. This has had terrible consequences on many marine species, which can lead to consequences for those that eat fish and marine life for nutrients – including people.

3. Land Pollution

When plastic is dumped in landfills, it interacts with water and form hazardous chemicals. When these chemicals seep underground, they degrade the water quality. Wind carries and deposits plastic from one place to another, increasing the land litter. It can also get stuck on poles, traffic lights, trees, fences, tower etc. and animals that may come in the vicinity and might suffocate them to death.

4. Air Pollution

Burning of plastic in the open air, leads to environmental pollution due to the release of poisonous chemicals. The polluted air when inhaled by humans and animals affect their health and can cause respiratory problems.

5. It Kills Animals

Despite countless TV ads over the years showing ducks or dolphins trapped in six-ring plastic can holders, these items are still used and discarded en masse each day. Whether because the mass of plastic has displaced animals or the related toxins have poisoned them, plastic pollution does a lot of damage to the world’s ecosystems.

6. It is Poisonous

Man artificially makes plastic by using a number of toxic chemicals. Therefore, the use of and exposure to plastics has been linked to a number of health concerns affecting people around the world. The processes of making, storing, disposing of, and just being around plastics can be extremely harmful to living things.

7. It is Expensive

It costs millions of dollars each year to clean affected areas after exposure, not to mention the loss of life to plants, animals, and people. As land becomes more valuable, just finding a place to put garbage is becoming a problem in many parts of the world.

Plus, excess pollution leads to decreased tourism in affected areas, significantly impacting those economies.

Organization Skills for Students

images (10)Staying organized is important for any student to be successful. However, many struggle to stay organized. In fact, our recent survey highlights that a lack of organization is the leading barrier to student success.

For some, it’s an issue of getting started and for others, it’s difficult maintaining an organization system. Organizational skills for students apply to any age. It’s never too late to practice organization in the classroom.

Here are 7 ways to enhance organizational skills for students:

1. Start With Sorting

It may seem obvious, but sorting alleviates disorganization so that important papers and documents aren’t misplaced. Sorting school work into binders and folders is a practical skill to teach students. This skill not only teaches students organization skills but also how to prioritize items.

As students keep their documents and school work organized by assigning a place for each item. A logical method is by assigning a folder for each subject or class. Have students use folders and binders as a designated place for tasks and school work, including:

  • Handouts
  • Tests and quizzes
  • Class notes
  • Homework
  • Take-home forms
  • Graded assignments

High priority assignments or information can be sorted into a separate folder in the front of a student’s binder for fast approaching due dates.

2. Use a Checklist

Checklists are instrumental in helping disorganized students get their tasks in order. Preparing a checklist also demonstrates to students how to prioritize tasks.

For instance, you can provide checklists to students in elementary school so they can get familiar with deadlines and project details. Print out a checklist, so that the student has it available with them wherever they go.

Older students can leverage project management tools for organizing checklists and practice assigning tasks to group members during projects.

3. Emphasize Brevity

Too many tasks on a to-do list can lead to students putting things off. Have students focus on getting a set number of tasks completed within a day, such as only working on four assignments at any given time. By organizing a concise list, students successfully complete their goals.

4. Leverage School Planners

Being able to know when assignments are due is an important part of being organized. Teach students to stay organized by using a school planner. While it’s great to use calendars on smartphones, writing down deadlines actually increases retention.

A Psychology Science study found that writing with pen and paper helps to boost your memory more than writing via laptops. School planners also have a built-in benefit of a calendar that students can leverage to plan out projects and assignments.

A school planner calendar is a great resource for younger students. Parents can place their signatures to confirm that the child completed a homework assignment. This helps students to better manage their time and increases parent involvement and communication.

Create space inside a planner where students organize handwritten notes, create project timelines, and structure lists.

5. Use Visual Tools

A simple way to facilitate organizational skills for students is by using visual reminders. When you use visual reminders, students can easily identify what needs to be done. Stickers and color-coded labels remind students about an important deadline or project to complete.

Visual tools not only serve as reminders, but as an easy way to maintain organization in and outside of the classroom. Try handing out color-coded labels to students at the beginning of the academic year, quarter, or semester. Students can adhere color-coded labels to folders and organize school work by subjects. Your students can then use a matching highlighter to indicate upcoming due dates

6. Assign “Buddies”

Hold students accountable for developing their organizational skills by assigning them a buddy. In this routine, paired student “buddies” are responsible to remind one another about important deadlines.

Older students can also serve as accountability partners and help absent students tackle missed assignments.

7. Schedule Cleaning Time

When your work area is messy, it’s hard to focus. Thus, setting aside time on a weekly or bi-weekly basis to clean is essential for success.

Teach your students the importance of scheduling time to clean their workspace and compartments, such as their desks, backpacks, lockers, or cubbies. Jars and cups function as a simple tool to hold pens, markers, or pencils.

Whether you’re teaching elementary school students or college students, organizational skills are necessary for students of any age in order to be successful. With the right organizational skills, students can achieve their educational goals.

Gandhi Jayanti

Gandhi Jayanti is an event celebrated in India to mark the birth anniversary of Mohandas Gandhi, born 2 October 1869. It is celebrated annually on 2 October, and it is one of the three national holidays of India. The UN General Assembly announced on 15 June 2007 that it adopted a resolution which declared that 2 October will be celebrated as the International Day of Non-Violence.

Gandhi Jayanti is celebrated yearly on 2nd October. It is one of the official declared national holidays of India, observed in all of its states and union territories.

Gandhi Jayanti is marked by prayer services and tributes all over India, including at Gandhi’s memorial Raj Ghat in New Delhi where he was cremated. Popular activities include prayer meetings, commemorative ceremonies in different cities by colleges, local government institutions and socio-political institutions. Painting and essay competitions are conducted and best awards are granted for projects in schools and the community encouraging a non-violent way of life as well as celebrating Gandhi’s effort in the Indian independence movement. Gandhi’s favourite bhajan (Hindu devotional song), Raghupati Raghav Raja Ram, is usually sung in his memory. Statues of Mahatma Gandhi throughout the country are decorated with flowers and garlands, and some people avoid drinking alcohol or eating meat on the day. Public buildings, banks and post offices are closed.

Mathrubhumi reported Gandhi Jayanthi celebrations @ Best CBSE School in Kochi Greets Public Schoolgpsss

Gandhi Jayanthi Celebrations @ Best CBSE Higher Secondary School in Kochi:  https://www.facebook.com/greetspublicschool/videos/386196148744025/

Images

71104668_1310918169107670_6225240081175674880_n 71139924_1310918625774291_5030425942305013760_n 71169495_1310918972440923_1836839692956336128_n 71326817_1310918139107673_1304219192261607424_n 71331894_1310918372440983_8632440886896099328_n 71346147_1310917882441032_4967647483376173056_n 71702751_1310918929107594_2957079790680539136_n 71710929_1310917575774396_8289467110992642048_n 71867498_1310918222440998_3844008443023196160_n 71902700_1310917685774385_3922470580623769600_n 71907266_1310917869107700_3538996311091052544_n 72119585_1310917545774399_6536158480334585856_n 72304535_1310916969107790_1613013060077748224_n