Ways to Unleash Your Child’s Talents

If you’re trying to learn how to discover your child’s talent, the secret lies in allowing kids to discover their interests and finding those activities that excite them like no other. From there, kids learn the determination and perseverance needed to become precisely what they want to be. Let’s take a deeper look at some no-nonsense ways to uncover your child’s talents.

No rushing, no pressure

Instead of competing with the other kids on the block, avoid pressuring your child into many different activities, and find out what it is your child is really passionate about. Once your child picks an activity, whether it’s playing piano, or joining the city swim team, don’t rush your child to learn the skill or become the best. Support your child, but remember that being pushy can be discouraging.

Appreciate your child’s generation

More kids today are learning how to code through programming classes designed specifically for kids. Why not embrace your child’s internet generation? While older generations may complain that kids today have never experienced life before technology, it can be harnessed to motivate children to find their passion. Instead of thinking about what you or your parents did as a child, think more like a kid today, and fully embrace the current culture.

It’s okay to make mistakes

To teach your child about long-term goals and rewards, reinforce the idea that as people, we all learn from our mistakes. Failure is necessary for growth, and once your child internalizes this essential life lesson, he or she will realize that mistakes are an opportunity for making strides ahead. In turn, your child will develop resiliency and confidence in any endeavor.

Foster a healthy parent-child relationship

Simply remaining calm during setbacks and conflicts reinforce your child’s trust in you and bolsters a safe space for learning. By showing your child that you accept him and love him even when he makes mistakes, sets the stage for continued growth. Praise your child for ongoing efforts, even if it seems that your child is progressing slower than expected or hoped for.

Be open to your child’s ideas and aspirations

When determining how to discover your child’s talent, step back and let your child lead the way. Be open to the ideas your child proposes, and if it’s in reason, explore each possibility to uncover your child’s true interests. Your child will be happier in the end, and even if your child’s talent isn’t something that would naturally interest you, take pride in his individuality.

Praise effort and successes without gloating over natural abilities

However, it’s important to avoid praising kids for those natural abilities they possess. Kids didn’t ask to be born naturally better at anything. Just like someone’s physical appearance, a natural talent is not something anyone could take credit for. Instead, praise your child’s effort and hard work, and build your child’s confidence and stamina for developing a skill. As a result, your child will unleash his or her talent, while also building a positive character trait.

Practice progress, not perfection

Encourage your child to keep going by reinforcing the idea that a lot of practice is needed to improve an ability or skill. Make sure to check your own expectations, and remember that your child is working at a long-term goal, and that perfection is never the goal.

Source: https://www.kidsacademy.mobi/storytime/how-to-discover-your-childs-talent/

 

Aristotle

Aristotle was a Greek philosopher and polymath during the Classical period in Ancient Greece. Taught by Plato, he was the founder of the Lyceum, the Peripatetic school of philosophy, and the Aristotelian tradition. His writings cover many subjects including physics, biology, zoology, metaphysics, logic, ethics, aesthetics, poetry, theatre, music, rhetoric, psychology, linguistics, economics, politics, and government. Aristotle provided a complex synthesis of the various philosophies existing prior to him. It was above all from his teachings that the West inherited its intellectual lexicon, as well as problems and methods of inquiry. As a result, his philosophy has exerted a unique influence on almost every form of knowledge in the West and it continues to be a subject of contemporary philosophical discussion.

Little is known about his life. Aristotle was born in the city of Stagira in Northern Greece. His father, Nicomachus, died when Aristotle was a child, and he was brought up by a guardian. At seventeen or eighteen years of age he joined Plato’s Academy in Athens and remained there until the age of thirty-seven (c. 347 BC). Shortly after Plato died, Aristotle left Athens and, at the request of Philip II of Macedon, tutored Alexander the Great beginning in 343 BC. He established a library in the Lyceum which helped him to produce many of his hundreds of books on papyrus scrolls. Though Aristotle wrote many elegant treatises and dialogues for publication, only around a third of his original output has survived, none of it intended for publication.

Aristotle’s views on physical science profoundly shaped medieval scholarship. Their influence extended from Late Antiquity and the Early Middle Ages into the Renaissance, and were not replaced systematically until the Enlightenment and theories such as classical mechanics were developed. Some of Aristotle’s zoological observations found in his biology, such as on the hectocotyl (reproductive) arm of the octopus, were disbelieved until the 19th century. His works contain the earliest known formal study of logic, studied by medieval scholars such as Peter Abelard and John Buridan. Aristotle’s influence on logic also continued well into the 19th century.

He influenced Judeo-Islamic philosophies (800–1400) during the Middle Ages, (Maimonides respected his intelligence but refuted his view of “thinking being” with view of “praying being”, as well as Christian theology, especially the Neoplatonism of the Early Church and the scholastic tradition of the Catholic Church. Aristotle was revered among medieval Muslim scholars as “The First Teacher” and among medieval Christians like Thomas Aquinas as simply “The Philosopher”. His ethics, though always influential, gained renewed interest with the modern advent of virtue ethics, such as in the thinking of Alasdair MacIntyre and Philippa Foot.