Risks of Global Warming Rising

The effects of global warming or climate damage include far-reaching and long-lasting changes to the natural environment, to ecosystems and human societies caused directly or indirectly by human emissions of greenhouse gases. It also includes the economic and social changes which stem from living in a warmer world. Human caused climate change is one of the threats to sustainability.

Many physical impacts of global warming are already visible, including extreme weather events, glacier retreat, changes in the timing of seasonal events (e.g., earlier flowering of plants), sea level rise, and declines in Arctic sea ice extent. The future impact of global warming depends on the extent to which nations implement prevention efforts and reduce greenhouse gas emissions. Ocean acidification is not a consequence of global warming, but instead has the same cause: increasing atmospheric carbon dioxide.

Climate change has already impacted ecosystems and humans as well. In combination with climate variability, it makes food insecurity worse in many places and puts pressure on fresh water supply. This in combination with extreme weather events, leads to negative effects on human health. Rising temperatures threaten development because of negative effects on economic growth in developing countries. The social impact of climate change will be further affected by society’s efforts to prepare and adapt.Global warming already contributes to migration in different parts of the world.

Near-term climate change policies significantly affect long-term climate change impacts. Stringent mitigation policies might be able to limit global warming (in 2100) to around 2 °C or below, relative to pre-industrial levels.[17][18] Without mitigation, increased energy demand and extensive use of fossil fuels might lead to global warming of around 4 °C.Higher magnitudes of global warming would be more difficult to adapt to, and would increase the risk of negative impacts.

Source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Effects_of_global_warming

Nutrient Requirements Across Age Groups

Children 2-8 years of age

One key nutrient that is important for children ages 2 through 8 would include iron.  According to Grosvenor & Smolin (2018), children do not consume the right amount of iron in their diet however, this vitamin is one that is important for growth and development.  Also, iron is a counterpart of hemoglobin that is responsible for transporting oxygen away from the lungs to the rest of the body (Gavin, 2016).  Iron is said to be one of the nutrients that children get the least of in their diet.  However, two age appropriate foods for this age group includes iron-fortified breakfast cereals and meats such as beef (Grosvenor & Smolin, 2018).

Adolescents 9-18 years of age

 One key nutrient for adolescents ages 9 through 18 years may include vitamin D.  Therefore, vitamin D is important due to its role in keeping bones healthy since the bones in adolescents grow at a faster rate (Grosvenor & Smolin, 2019).  Also, vitamin D goes hand and hand with calcium, without vitamin D calcium cannot be absorbed (Grosvenor & Smolin, 2018).  However, vitamin D is found in some foods that are fortified but the best source to obtain this vitamin is through the sun.  Furthermore, foods sources for vitamin D that would be appropriate for this age group include milk and eggs.

Adults 19-64 years of age

 One key nutrient that is important for adults 19 through 64 years old includes vitamin C.  This nutrient is responsible for eye health and aids in healthy oral surfaces, and vessels (American Optometric Association, n.d.).  Also, vitamin C is important for protecting the body from the common cold and makes the immune system stronger (Wong, 2019).  Furthermore, these adults require vitamin C because helps to heal wounds and has antioxidant properties which shields against free radical that occurs from environment or when food is digested (Mayo Clinic Staff, 2017).  Lastly, two foods that would be appropriate for this age group includes orange juice, oranges, grapefruit and spinach (American Optometric Association, n.d.).

Adults 65 and older

 One key nutrient that is important for adults 65 and older is calcium.  Therefore, the importance of calcium in older adults is it helps to prevent bones from becoming weak and fragile that are prone to developing osteoporosis (Grosvenor & Smolin, 2018).  However, when people get older calcium absorption decreases so, it is very important that this age group gets the adequate amount in their diet.  Therefore, older adult men are recommended to get 1000 mg/day and adult women 1200 mg/day (Grosvenor & Smolin, 2018).  In addition, there are foods that are a good source of calcium that this age group can incorporate in their diet each day.  The food sources that would be most appropriate are milk, collard greens, broccoli, sardines.  Furthermore, if the person cannot consume dairy products and is lactose intolerant alternatives like almond, rice and soymilk are available (NOF, n.d.).

            All the age groups have certain nutrients that are needed to help the body function and to stay healthy.  Therefore, eating foods that have these nutrients can help us from getting a cold, preventing bone loss, boost our immune system and help growth and development.