Wonder of Science

Looking at the age when a man led a life like a savage, we notice how far we have come. Similarly, the evolution of mankind is truly commendable. One of the major driving forces behind this is science. It makes you think about the wonder of science and how it has proven to be such a boon in our lives. Most importantly, science has helped develop a great civilization. All the advancements that man has been able to make are with the help of science only. However, it won’t be wrong to say that science is a two-edged sword. It comes with its own set of advantages and disadvantages.

 

Advantages of Science

To say that science has a lot of benefits would be an understatement. The benefits of science do not just limit to one sphere, but it has proven useful in various spheres of the world. When we talk about innovations in science and engineering, electricity is the first thing that comes to mind. It has helped power the world through its development.

That is to say, all the credit goes to science, as it weren’t for science, life in the 21st century would be impossible. After all, it is quite hard to imagine a world without computers, medicines, televisions, AC’s, automobiles and more. In addition, science has contributed largely to the medical field as well.

It has helped cure deadly diseases and also perform surgeries which were hard to perform before. Therefore, science has changed the world in unimaginable ways.

Disadvantages of Science

As the saying goes ‘there is no rainbow without rain’, similarly science has drawbacks of its own. One must always remember that anything in excess is poison, and science is no different. If it falls into evil hands, it can cause destruction on a massive level. For instance, science is used to create nuclear weapons.

These are deadly enough to cause war and wipe out full-fledged countries. Another drawback is the pollution caused by it. As the world became more industrialized because of science, pollution levels increased. All the high-scale industries are now polluting natural resources like water, air, wood, and more.

Subsequently, this industrial growth has increased rates of unemployment as machines are replacing human labor. So, we see how it also has a considerable amount of drawbacks as well.

In conclusion, we can say that surely science is very beneficial to the modern man. But, innovations and discoveries have also become destructive in various ways for mankind.

UNICEF

UNICEF works in over 190 countries and territories to protect the rights of every child. UNICEF has spent 70 years working to improve the lives of children and their families.

The United Nations Children’s Fund is a United Nations agency responsible for providing humanitarian and developmental aid to children around the world. It was established in 1946 as the United Nations International Children’s Emergency Fund (UNICEF) by the U.N. General Assembly, at the behest of Polish physician Ludwik Rajchman, to provide immediate hunger relief and healthcare to children and mothers in countries devastated by World War II. In 1950, UNICEF’s mandate was extended to address the long-term needs of children and women in developing countries, and in 1953 it became a permanent part of the United Nations System. The agency’s name was subsequently changed to its current form, though it retains the original acronym.

UNICEF relies entirely on contributions from governments and private donors. Its total income as of 2018 was $5.2 billion, of which two-thirds came from governments; private groups and individuals contribute the rest through national committees. It is governed by a 36-member executive board that establishes policies, approves programs, and oversees administrative and financial plans. The board is made up of government representatives elected by the United Nations Economic and Social Council, usually for three-year terms.

UNICEF’s programs emphasize developing community-level services to promote the health and well-being of children. Most of its work is in the field, with a presence in 192 countries and territories. Its network includes 150 country offices, headquarters and other offices, and 34 “national committees” that carry out its mission through programs developed with host governments. Seven regional offices provide technical assistance to country offices as needed.

UNICEF’s Supply Division is based in Copenhagen and New York, both serves as point of distribution for such essential items as vaccines, antiretroviral medicines for children and mothers with HIV, nutritional supplements, emergency shelters, family reunification, and educational supplies. UNICEF was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize in 1965, the Indira Gandhi Prize in 1989 and the Prince of Asturias Award of Concord in 2006.